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Rise

April 8 at 11 p.m.

Simultaneously, the phones begin to ring throughout the intensive care unit, breaking the monopoly of soft, steady barrels from each patient set.

Ontario’s latest emergency warning says “home stay order is in effect”, marking the beginning of rising locks across the province after rising COVID-19 case counts and record-breaking critical care combinations narrowed to narrow provincial reopening. Projects.

To this day, more than 500 COVID-19 patients are in critical care units in the province, where 24 are in Centennial Hospital, filling most of the beds available. A week later, the provincial-level figure hit 635.

Lorraine Pinto, a soft-spoken social worker who helps patients’ families move on to their loved one’s illness, insists many of those admitted may not be at home as requested by the province.

Most of the time, the infected are essential workers, he says. Many are bringing the virus back to many generations living under the same roof.

“Imagine yourself and someone who’s done just as well as I did, went to a job in a factory, contracted COVID, maybe in their 40s or 50s.”

Watch | How COVID-19 spreads through families, attacking many generations:

Across Toronto, those trends have been evident for months, with explosions considered necessary in all types of indoor systems, including schools, food processing plants, shipyards, factories and manufacturing facilities. More and more people of color are carrying loads.

According to the most up-to-date population data available from the Toronto Public Health Agency, the vast majority of cases reported across the city – approximately 76 percent – are among people identified as an “ethnic group”.

Moreover, after adjusting for age, the rate of hospitalization among the city’s low-income population is three times higher than the rate among those living in high-financial blockages.

Patients recently admitted to Century ICUs of various backgrounds and ages, including a man under the age of 50, are being kept in an isolated room with long-recorded nurse Jose Fashion, while the team is awaiting the results of the patient’s Govit-19 test.

After carefully removing her safety gloves and gown, she exits through the sealed door of the fashion room. He says he is now caring for the ill patients who are at the primary stage of his life. Recently, the team has He started treating some young people In their 20s and 30s.

“On the first wave we saw a lot more old people,” he says. “But in the third wave this trend is pouring in, the younger generation.”

Watch | What it looks like to put eight patients on ventilators overnight:

Dr. Martin Bates, medical director of Criticism of the Scarborough Health Network, points out the widespread types of viruses that can spread rapidly among family members.

“So far on Wave 3, we’ve allowed seven husband-wife pairs,” he says. “I think the virus coming into homes is a sign that everyone is getting infected. More and more people are coming to the hospital together because it’s more powerful than the previous virus.”

On a recent Saturday, Bates pushed eight patients with COVID-19 back into mechanical ventilators overnight, the most intuitive he has ever made in a career change.

“The hardest part of everything is the conversations that take place before doing so, to see them say goodbye,” he says.

“We knew they were going to be on a ventilator for a few weeks, in a medically induced coma, so we could provide mechanical ventilation, and we knew half of them were not going to survive.”

Registered nurse Jose Fashion is caring for a 50-year-old patient in a solitary room in the intensive care unit of Century Hospital. (Evan Mitsui / CBC)

Registered nurse Jose Fashion is caring for a 50-year-old patient in a solitary room in the intensive care unit of Century Hospital. (Evan Mitsui / CBC)

Registered nurse Jose Fashion is caring for a 50-year-old patient in a solitary room in the intensive care unit of Century Hospital. (Evan Mitsui / CBC)

Registered nurse Jose Fashion is caring for a 50-year-old patient in a solitary room in the intensive care unit of Century Hospital. (Evan Mitsui / CBC)

Sophia Harrison

Part time worker

I'm Sophia Harrison working as a part-time staff at the Costco since the past year until I become as an author at the iron blade, hope I can use my experiences with the supermarkets here.

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