P.C. Mom encourages other pregnant women to get a COVID-19 shot – Silvivac improvement

Megan Gillie, a 35-year-old emergency room doctor and new mother, was vaccinated with COVID-19 in January while she was pregnant. She encourages others to do the same. (Submitted)
Megan Gillie, a 35-year-old emergency room doctor and new mother, was vaccinated with COVID-19 in January while she was pregnant. She encourages others to do the same. (Submitted)Megan Gillie, a 35-year-old emergency room doctor and new mom, was vaccinated with COVID-19 in January while she was pregnant. She encourages others to do the same. (Submitted)
Megan Gillie, a 35-year-old emergency room doctor and new mom, was vaccinated with COVID-19 in January while she was pregnant. She encourages others to do the same. (Submitted)Megan Gillie, a 35-year-old emergency room doctor and new mother, was vaccinated with Covit-19 in January when she was pregnant. She encourages others to do the same. (Submitted)

Now that they are qualified, a doctor in Vancouver is soon encouraging other moms to be vaccinated for COVID-19.

“This is the best decision for me and my baby,” said 35-year-old Megan Gillie.

When she was six months pregnant, P.C. The pediatric hospital emergency room doctor administered Pfizer-Bioendech medication in January among other health workers at a provincial health services authority clinic.

According to her, the risk of contracting the disease from COVID-19 has been proven to be more worrying than the side effects of the vaccine since she was pregnant.

“After the first shot I had a slight sore, but he felt unwell,” he said.

He received his second dose the same month his son Henry was born.

“My hand got sore later, and the next day I was a little more tired, but it’s hard to say because I was in my third trimester,” Gillie said.

At the end of February, Henry was born full time.

“He’s a very healthy baby,” his mother said.

The risk increased COVID-19 Intensity

Reports from Canada show that pregnant women with COVID-19 are at increased risk of hospitalization, admission to intensive care units, and preterm birth.

This is according to Dr. Chelsea Elwood P.C., a reproductive pathologist. She was first seen working at a women’s hospital.

“When we acknowledge them, they face the same respiratory problems as those under the age of 50, including shortness of breath and need for oxygen.”

Expert recommends COVID-19 vaccines approved by Health Canada for pregnant and breastfeeding women.

“There are no known miscarriages or birth defects,” she said.

“What has surfaced on social media is that the vaccine can cause infertility, but it is not based on good science.”

If anything, he said, pregnant women could pass COVID-fighting antibodies to the baby through the uterus or through breast milk.



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Sophia Harrison

Part time worker

I'm Sophia Harrison working as a part-time staff at the Costco since the past year until I become as an author at the iron blade, hope I can use my experiences with the supermarkets here.

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