The first results of the Fermilapin Muon G-2 experiment strengthen the evidence of new physics

Strong evidence that mions deviate from standard model calculations may indicate exciting new physics. Mions act as a window into the sub-world, where they can interact with undiscovered particles or forces.

“Today is an extraordinary day, long awaited not only by us, but by the entire international physics community,” said Graziano Venanzoni, co-spokesman for the Mune G-2 experiment and physicist at the Italian National Institute for Atomic Physics. “We owe a great deal of credit to our young researchers for allowing us to achieve this incredible result with their talent, ideas and enthusiasm.”

A muon is 200 times larger than its relative electron. Cosmic rays occur naturally when they strike the Earth’s atmosphere, and particle accelerators in the fermilab can produce them in large numbers. Like electrons, muons act like a small internal magnet. In a strong magnetic field, the direction of the magnet, or oscillation, is like the axis of a spiral or gyroscope. The strength of the inner magnet determines the rate at which the muon advances in the outer magnetic field and is described by a number that physicists call the G-factor. This number can be calculated with very high accuracy.

Because muons are in circulation in the muon G-2 magnet, they interact with the quantum foam of subatomic particles that appear outside and outside the location. Interactions with these short-lived particles affect the value of the G-factor so that the prototype of the muons increases in speed or decreases slightly. The so-called paradoxical magnetic moment is most accurately predicted by the standard model. But if the quantum foam has additional forces or particles that are not calculated by the standard model, it will be further modified by the Muon G-factor.

“This size we measure represents the interactions of the muon with everything in the universe. But when theorists calculate the same size, using all the known forces and particles in the standard model, we do not get the same answer,” he said. Renee Fatmey, A physicist University of Kentucky And simulation manager for the Muon g-2 test. “This is strong evidence that Muon is sensitive to something that is not in our best theory.”

A pilot experiment at the DOE’s Brookhaven National Laboratory, which ended in 2001, provided indications that Mune’s behavior did not agree with the standard model. The new measurement of the Muon g-2 experiment in Fermilab strongly agrees with the value found in Brookhaven and differs from the theory with the most accurate measurement to date.

Accepted theoretical values ​​for Mune:
g-Factor: 2.00233183620 (86) [uncertainty in parentheses]
Irregular magnetic moment: 0.00116591810 (43)

New Test World Average Results Announced Today by the Muon g-2 collaboration:
g-Factor: 2.00233184122 (82)
Irregular magnetic moment: 0.00116592061 (41)

The combined results of Fermilab and Brookhaven show a difference in theory with the significance of 4.2 sigma, a small shame of 5 sigma (or fixed deviations) that scientists should demand a discovery, but compelling evidence of new physics. The chances of the results being statistically volatile are 1 in 40,000.

The Fermilab test re-uses key components from the Brookhaven test, a 50-foot diameter superconducting magnetic storage ring. In 2013, it was transported 3,200 miles by land and sea Long Island To Chicago In the suburbs, scientists could take advantage of the fermilap particle accelerator and generate a more intense beam of muon. United Nations. Over the next four years, the researchers collected the experiment; Tuned and incredibly calibrated Uniform magnetic field; Developed new techniques, tools and simulations; And fully tested the entire system.

The Muon g-2 sends a beam of muon into the test storage ring, where it propagates thousands of times at the speed of light. Detectors lined up in the ring allow scientists to determine how fast the mounds are advancing.

In its first year of operation, in 2018, the FermiLap test collected more data than all previous Muon G-factor tests. With more than 200 scientists from 35 companies in seven countries, the Muon G-2 collaboration has now completed the study of the movement of more than 8 billion muons from that first run.

“Twenty years after the end of the Brookhaven experiment, it is a great pleasure to finally solve this mystery,” said the Fermilab scientist Chris Polly, Was the co-spokesman for the current experiment and was a leading graduate student in the Brookhaven experiment.

Data analysis of the second and third runs of the test is underway, the fourth run is underway, and the fifth run is scheduled. Combining the results from all five runs will give scientists a more accurate measure of Mune’s wobble, and will reveal with greater certainty whether new physics is hidden within quantum foam.

“We’ve analyzed less than 6% of the data collected at the end of the test so far. Although these first results say there is an intriguing difference with the standard model, we will learn more in the next two years,” Polly said.

“The subtle behavior of mions is a remarkable achievement that will lead to many years of search for physics beyond the standard model,” said Fermilab Deputy Director of Research. Joe Licken. “This is an exciting time for particle physics research, and Fermilap is at the forefront.”

Fermilab is the United States’ premier national laboratory for particle physics research. The U.S. Department of Energy office is located near the FermiLab scientific laboratory Chicago, Illinois, And operated under a contract with Fermi Research Alliance LLC. Visit the FermiLab website at http://www.fnal.gov Follow us on Twitter Er Fermilab.

The DOE Science Office is a major supporter of basic research in the physical sciences United Nations And works to meet some of the most important challenges of our time. For more information, visit http://science.energy.gov.

SOURCE Fermilab

For more information: Tracy Mark, 224-290-7803, [email protected], www.fnal.gov

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Sophia Harrison

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I'm Sophia Harrison working as a part-time staff at the Costco since the past year until I become as an author at the iron blade, hope I can use my experiences with the supermarkets here.

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