The province to reduce surgeries as the test positive is still at a very high level

“If new species are caught at a positive rate of more than 11 percent, they could all spread like wildfire,” said Tehseen Lata, a doctor in Edmonton.

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Faced with a third COVID-19 wave, the province on Tuesday announced a 30 percent reduction in surgery in its most populous regions.

The move came as the province’s test positive rate reached 11.4 percent on Monday – the highest level since the outbreak.

This is the first time since the second wave of COVID-19 that the figure has exceeded 11 percent since December 3, and 1,539 new cases have been reported in the province.

Surgeries in the Coalfield, Edmonton and Northern Zones will be re-scaled to ensure there is sufficient hospital capacity to handle patient expectations.

“Starting today, the next two weeks (AHS) will reduce scheduled surgical operations by up to 30 percent, as well as reduce some emergency procedures and ambulatory appointments,” AHS said on Twitter.

“Postponed surgery, ambulatory and scheduled procedures will be reprinted soon.”

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A.H.S. They added that only those in contact would be affected.

AHS The system is currently hospitalized and has sufficient capacity for ICU patients, and can increase ICU seats as requested – as it did late last year.

But doctors have been sounding the alarm and calling for weeks Strict health measures And compliance to curb the number of infections and prevent overuse of the health care system.

“If new species are caught at a positive rate of more than 11 per cent, they could all spread like wildfire,” said Tehseen Lata, an Edmonton doctor.

The number of COVID-19 hospitals in the province has also risen from 616 to 635 in the past day, to 143, despite having two fewer patients in the ICU.

“The growth rate (in infections) is less steep, but it is important to note that the numbers are constantly rising, which is obvious,” Dr. Deena Hinsha, chief medical officer of Alberta Health, said Tuesday.

“Simply put, we’re still going in the wrong direction.”

The number of active cases in Alberta – 20,721 – is the second highest since the outbreak began 13 months ago.

The reproduction rate of the virus also increased from 1.04 to 1.05 last week.

While the province has counted seven more deaths related to the virus, 14 previous deaths that were initially thought to be related to COVID-19 were diagnosed with other causes, bringing the total death toll to 2,067.

While some doctors in the province insist that public health measures be tightened to reduce infections, Hinsha will not say if he recommends lawmakers with the final word because of cabinet secrecy.

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But reducing exposure through physical contact tasks is obvious, he said.

“When fewer people interact with people outside their homes, we know there will be less outbreaks,” he said.

On Monday, Prime Minister Jason Kenny said Adding additional restrictions may trigger a backlash against compliance.

Hinsha said on Tuesday: “For the rules to be effective, you need to keep both rules in place and for people who follow the rules.”

With the growing case numbers, it is clear that the health measures announced three weeks ago are not effective and should be increased to stop non-essential services, Lata said.

“It’s terrifying – we only have to watch the second wave, we know it’s going to be bad because we reached that ICU peak (in December), but we have not reached the peak yet,” he said.

“We know it’s going to be a disaster, but the public does not seem to think so. They are already reorganizing doctors into ICUs.”

Lata said mixed messaging from a government, some of them The MLAs opposed the existing restrictions, And apparent infectious fatigue led many people to abandon following the COVID-19 protocol.

“MLAs oppose even limited restrictions. The public does not know how much they should worry – now they have to worry so much,” he said.

He said the province’s intensive care health workers were reaching a breaking point and were afraid of what was to come.

“The third wave has no balance… They are shocked by what they saw in the second wave,” Lata said.

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On Tuesday, Hinsha expressed similar concerns about the declining public patience, once again asking Albertance to delay socialization and other routine activities.

“Right now, we need to stop spreading and reduce our cases a little bit more,” he said.

“Each of us is important, and our actions represent the difference between life and death for those around us.”

Some local community leaders and influencers “feel sad, hopeless, and no longer consider public health measures appropriate,” should be reminded of the gravity of the situation.

Lata and Hinsha both said that once vaccinated Albertons should not reduce their protection because it takes two weeks for immunization.

“No vaccine provides 100 percent protection,” Hinsha said.

So far, 1.46 million people in Alberta have received at least one dose of the vaccine, or 26 percent of the population, while six percent are vaccinated, he said.

In the past day, 30,000 people have been vaccinated, according to Alberta Health.

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Twitter: IllBillKaufmannjrn

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Sophia Harrison

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I'm Sophia Harrison working as a part-time staff at the Costco since the past year until I become as an author at the iron blade, hope I can use my experiences with the supermarkets here.

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