June 23, 2024

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Apple wants to redefine AI as “Apple Intelligence” at WWDC

Apple wants to redefine AI as “Apple Intelligence” at WWDC

The Apple Worldwide Developers Conference (AAPL) kicks off this week, running from Monday, June 10 to Friday, June 14. The iPhone company is expected to showcase its next generation of products integrated with artificial intelligence. Apple CEO Tim Cook’s keynote is scheduled to begin at 1 p.m. ET.

Bob O’Donnell, TECHnalogy Research Head and Senior Analyst, joins Yahoo Finance’s Morning Briefing to underscore the drivers Apple’s AI products and services will have on technology stocks.

“And when Apple does that, a much larger audience sees what this is, starts to understand it, and then it becomes big,” O’Donnell says. “Even though they’re late to the game.” “And then the question… [is] Services: How can they start monetizing some of these features and adding to the huge services pie that has been the largest and most profitable part of the business for a long time?”

For more expert insights and the latest market action, click here to watch this full episode of Morning Summary.

This post was written by Luke Carberry Maughan.

Video version

A lot of hype and a lot of anticipation surrounding the AI ​​announcement that we would expect to hear my question to you, though, is how big of a catalyst do you see in Apple stock?

Well, first, of course, Dave, explaining to the world what artificial intelligence actually means, it’s not artificial intelligence.

Obviously it would be Apple Intelligence.

But anyway, look, here’s the thing, Brian was raising this question earlier.

What’s going to take people to machines and, you know, at the end of the day, a lot of this stuff is, it seems, mediocre Apple types, summarizing the text.

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Tell me what this site says.

Tell me what this document says, and create an email for me to automatically remove all these people in front of my family in my vacation photos so I can clean it up, you know, nice practical stuff.

The thing is, when Apple does this, and by the way, all of these things have been available on Android phones and other places for a long time, the difference is that it’s Apple, right?

And when Apple does that, a much larger audience sees what this is and starts to understand and internalize it, so it becomes a big thing even though they got into the game later.

Then the question is, and again, Brian alluded to their services, how do they start monetizing some of these features and adding them to that huge service pie?

This has been the largest and most profitable part of the business for a long time.

Bob.

I hear you, the digital assistant Siri would be great for me being able to scan a group of my friends from photos from five years ago.

I’m all for maybe wanting to share those things on social media.

That’s great.

But do we still view Apple as a laggard in the AI ​​arms race?

Can it be said that this is a company, two years behind on some news flow from AIA open to Microsoft and other similar companies or should investors be worried?

I mean, look, they were clearly behind Brian, but they were behind in a lot of other things and that didn’t slow them down.

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The bigger question for me is things like, you know, around rumored partnerships with open AI to integrate GP T-type chat technology into the Apple experience.

This is not Apple.

The usual Apple way of doing things.

They like to invent it themselves.

Thank you very much, but perhaps they were forced into this particular situation because they were too late in doing so.

And, you know, we’ve seen some strange things happen with open AI.

And of course Microsoft is using Open AI and how does all of this mix and what are the implications of that?

This is the kind of thing I’m curious about.

And you know, the other thing is timing wise, sometimes being a little late in the game on a brand new technology is just the right time, and the timing of this is actually like again, the trend of people starting to taper off.

Wow, actually, that’s really cool and that’s the kind of thing I want Bob O’Donnell, our long time video monitor, technologist, head of research, and president, to tell Bob O’Donnell.

Always good to see you talking to you soon.

Thanks guys.