Distant NASA probe finds bizarre hum in galaxy

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WASHINGTON – The 1979 classic science fiction horror film “Alien” was advertised with a memorable tagline, “No one can hear you screaming in space.” It says nothing about humming.

Scientists at NASA’s Voyager 1 spacecraft, which launched from outside our solar system nine years ago, have discovered that there is a faint dull hum caused by a series of small vibrations of gases found in the galaxy’s space.

This refers to the background noise that exists in the vast expanse between star systems. As Voyager 1 passed through galaxy space, these vibrations, known as continuous plasma waves at short-wavelength radio frequencies, were detected over a period of three years.

“The series of plasma waves we’ve discovered are actually too weak to hear with the human ear. If we could hear it, it would sound like a fixed note, play constantly, but change slightly over time,” said Cornell University astronomy student and editor-in-chief of a study published this week in the journal Nature. Said Stella Koch Ocker.Astronomy.

Launched in September 1977, the Voyager 1 spacecraft is currently about 14.1 billion miles (22.7 billion km) from Earth – about 152 times the distance between our planet and the Sun – and still transmits data.

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Voyager 1, which visited the gigantic planets Jupiter and Saturn decades ago, now provides insight into galaxy space.

Massive areas between stellar systems in a galaxy are not absolute vacuums. A bomb of low-density matter and radiation – often gas – is called a galaxy. About 15% of the matter visible in our Milky Way galaxy is made up of energetic particles such as gas, dust and cosmic rays.

Much of the galaxy’s medium is ionized, or electrically charged, and is called plasma.

“Interstellar plasma is very diffuse compared to what we are used to on Earth. In this plasma, there are about 0.1 atoms per cubic centimeter, while there are billions of atoms per cubic centimeter of air we breathe on Earth,” Ocker said.

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Voyager 1 previously detected gas disturbances in galaxy space triggered by occasional burning stimuli from our sun. The new study instead reveals constant vibrations unrelated to solar activity, which may be a constant feature in galaxy space. This ohm has a frequency of about 3 kHz (kHz).

“When plasma oscillations are converted into an audio signal, it seems to change tone. It’s a little weird, “said James Cortes, a professor of astronomy at Cornell University and co-author of the study.

After 44 years of travel, Voyager 1 is the most man-made distant object in space.

“Voyager 1 will continue, but its power will end this decade after 50 decades of service,” Cortes said. “Conceptual designs are being developed for future exploration, the purpose of which is to achieve more than the Voyager spacecraft. This is the message I am attracted to: our access to space is expanding.”

(Will Dunham Report, Compilation of Rosalpa O’Brien)

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Sophia Harrison

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I'm Sophia Harrison working as a part-time staff at the Costco since the past year until I become as an author at the iron blade, hope I can use my experiences with the supermarkets here.

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