The planets return to view, a total lunar eclipse in May

The latest drought for planetary observation is now ending in May, and the planets are far enough away to be seen safely from the sun. However, our moon will be even more important in this month’s activity.

The latest drought for planetary observation is now ending in May, and the planets are far enough away to be seen safely from the sun. However, our moon will be even more important in this month’s activity.

By May 1, Mercury and Venus will begin to appear on the WNW in 2100 – after sunset. Telescopes can help pick them up. The waning crescent moon will move right below 5 degrees below Saturn and Jupiter, respectively, from May 3 to 5 at 0500 SE just before sunrise.

In the early morning of May 6 we can see the Etta Aquarius meteor shower. It is a medium-busy meteorite stream; The genital hourly rate (ZHR) is predicted to be 60 meteors per hour, which is going well. The peak of 1900 is predicted to occur on the 5th, however when we face backwards in our orbit. So we have to rotate for another six hours until the radiation point reaches the horizon, and on the 6th we go to the stream by about 0100. Radiation is low in SE, a few degrees to the left and above Jupiter, and this is the point at which all meteorites appear. They appear anywhere in the sky.

The thinnest crescent new moon passes 1 degree to the left of Venus on the 12th and Mercury on the 13th. On May 15, the Moon moves slightly above Mars. Late on the 16th, Mercury reaches its greatest eastern length (22 degrees) from the Sun and begins to return before the Sun. By the 23rd, Mercury is a thin crescent and will fade fast in the evening as it comes around to go before the sun. However, Venus is orbiting farther east than the Sun. On May 28 the two inner planets will have a close connection – 0.4 degrees – after sunset. All of this Mercury-Venus activity takes place after sunset in the NW and takes place at less than 10 degrees – a fist width at arm’s length – above the horizon. Davis Bay should be the perfect place.

The four largest moons of Jupiter will be east of the planet just before sunrise on May 21; Left to right: Callisto, Europa, Canmeet and Io. This often does not happen – once or twice a month. If you do not have a telescope the standard pair of telescopes will show them

May 25/26 is when you get the drum roll and the drums. Nine hours before the largest lunar eclipse of the year, on the 25th 2100 the moon is in its closest orbit. The wave limits will be huge, of course, but this moonlight will be unusual; At about 0112 on the 26th, the left margin under this nice big moon enters the penumbral cone of the Earth’s shadow. Around 0245, the Earth’s shadow begins to enter the umbilical cord, which completely blocks the sun. It is halfway through 0322 and fully shaded by 0412 – total lunar eclipse! Fourteen minutes later, at 0426, the upper edge of the moon begins to leave the umbrella, destroying it before it sits at 0527. Telescopes are ideal for this eclipse – the eclipse moon is sometimes very dizzy and hard to see in the right place.

At 7pm on May 14th, the Sunshine Coast Astronomical Club hosts its monthly zoom meeting online. Dr. Ray Kostaszuk, whose title will be “Rivers of the Solar System”, is taken from the astronomical theme he is currently presenting. Four-week class at Elder College. Details and login information are available here: sunhinecoastastronomy.wordpress.com

Sophia Harrison

Part time worker

I'm Sophia Harrison working as a part-time staff at the Costco since the past year until I become as an author at the iron blade, hope I can use my experiences with the supermarkets here.

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